Author: Ethan

California’s deadliest wildfire season is still ahead

California's deadliest wildfire season is still ahead

California is so hot and dry that not even soaking rain can ease fall fire peril, experts say

By Kevin McGill

Posted Jul. 2, 2014 at 3:49 PM Updated Jul 2, 2014 at 2:12 PM

By Kevin McGill

Posted Jul. 2, 2014 at 3:49 PM Updated Jul 2, 2014 at 2:12 PM

A firefighter monitors an air tanker as a brush fire burns on Wednesday in Calaveras County, California. A wildfire that consumed nearly 900 homes in Sonoma County in early June was contained by July 14, according to Cal Fire. A wildfire that engulfed nearly 900 homes on the outskirts of Santa Rosa in Sonoma County in early June was contained late in July by July 14, according to Sonoma County Fire Department spokesman Rich Franklin.

A firefighter works an air tanker during a fire burning on Wednesday in Calaveras County, California.

A wildfire that consumed nearly 900 homes in Sonoma County in early June was contained by July 14, according to Cal Fire. A wildfire that engulfed nearly 900 homes on the outskirts of Santa Rosa in Sonoma County in early June was contained late in July by July 14, according to Sonoma County Fire Department spokesman Rich Franklin.

California wildfire fatalities rise to 1,030

By Kevin McGill

Posted Jul. 2, 2014 at 2:45 PM Updated Jul 2, 2014 at 2:46 PM

By Kevin McGill

Posted Jul. 2, 2014 at 2:45 PM Updated Jul 2, 2014 at 2:46 PM

A wildfire that had burned nearly 900 houses in Sonoma County in early June was contained, four days before its devastating size was revealed.

California’s most deadly wildland fire season hit new heights on Thursday when the Sonoma County blaze was revealed to have destroyed more than 1,000 homes, making it the state’s deadliest and most destructive fire season on record.

A second major fire burning just outside Santa Rosa in Sonoma County has been contained, and it was the deadliest blaze in California’s history, a day after new deaths from the fire in Sonoma County increased to 101, according to the Santa Rosa Police Department.

The new data suggested the state’s most lethal wildfire season in modern history is far from over and that there is still significant danger ahead.

By mid-July, state officials revised upward their estimates

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